Woolverstone

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Important Covid information

If all goes according to plan, the first tranche of pubs (those that are able to serve drinkers outdoors) may be able to reopen on April 12th. Though of course, in a situation like this, nothing is guaranteed. The rest of our pubs may be permitted to reopen from May 17th.

Pubs providing takeaways continue to be listed on this page.

Those known to be planning to reopen as soon as permitted are listed on this page.

Introduction

Please tell us if you know of any pubs here ready to reopen when outdoors service is permitted.

Woolverstone was recorded in Domesday as "Uluerestuna" and appears on John Speed's 1610 map as "Wuluerſton". The name is believed to derive from "Wulf's Stone", apparently named after a stone on which King Wulf (a Viking raider) sacrificed one of the inhabitants.

Woolverstone Hall, a Grade I listed country house dating from 1776, is used as a girls' school.

The Cat House (now in the grounds of the marina, see gallery) was where smuggling was directed from. When no revenue men were in the area, a stuffed cat was put in a window so smugglers on the river knew it was safe to land their booty.

In 1910, dredging work in the Orwell unearthed a 2.2m oak longboat, age unknown.

Woolverstone Marina is on the site of a WWII embarkation hard, built between 1942 and 1943 in preparation for D-Day.

Gallery

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History

A working men's club is listed in the 1916 Kelly's directory, but no pubs.

Acknowledgements

Some historical information from English Heritage's National Monuments Record.

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